Committees

Check out the details of your committee below

Beginner committees

GA1

1st General Assembly Committee 

Chair: Yara Bazeigh

Deputy Chair: Jady (Keyu) Yan

Disarmament and International Security

The Disarmament and International Security (DISEC) Committee is the General Assembly’s First Committee (GA1) and one of the six committees of the United Nations General Assembly. It includes all United Nations Member States, as under the UN Charter, all member states and observer states of the United Nations are part of the First Committee and have an equal vote. Documents devised by the First Committee require a simple majority (51%) to pass and like other General Assembly Committees is not able to authorize armed interventions, impose sanctions or pass binding resolutions.  Like all General Assembly committees the GA1 deals with matters regarding world peace, but focuses on dealing with affairs that threaten to endanger international security and acknowledges all disarmament and international security matters, within the field of the UN Charter.

​The First Committee is arguably the most important of the six General Assembly Committees, mainly due to the complex topics being discussed. More than other Committees in the General Assembly, the aim of the DISEC Committee is to present effective solutions, that focus on addressing the nature of the problem to permanently settle the issue.

The first contribution of the GA1 to the United Nations was Resolution 1 regarding the problems raised by the discovery of atomic energy on January 24 1946 which led to the creating of the United Nations Atomic Energy Commission (UNAEC).

​The First Committee is arguably the most important of the six General Assembly Committees, mainly due to the complex topics being discussed. More than other Committees in the General Assembly, the aim of the DISEC Committee is to present effective solutions, that focus on addressing the nature of the problem to permanently settle the issue.

The first contribution of the GA1 to the United Nations was Resolution 1 regarding the problems raised by the discovery of atomic energy on January 24 1946 which led to the creating of the United Nations Atomic Energy Commission (UNAEC).

Topic 1: Promoting Global Cooperation on Cybersecurity Amid Transnational Threats. 

Topic 2: Illegal Trafficking of Small Arms by Promoting Control Measures.

Topic 3: Dealing with the Escalating Challenge of 3D Printed weaponry in Worldwide Conflict.

Greece
Belgium
Palestine
South Korea
South Africa
Switzerland 
Hungary
Australia
Cuba
Brazil
Israel
United States
Norway
Iran
China 
France
United Kingdom
Indonesia
Mexico
UAE
Ukraine
Kenya 
Russia 

GA2

2nd General Assembly Committee 

Chair: Ila Blower

Deputy Chair: Deniz Gümüş

Economic and Financial

The Economic and Financial Committee is the General Assembly’s Second Committee (GA2) and one of the four committees of the United Nations General Assembly. It includes all United Nations Member States, as under the UN Charter, all member states and observer states of the United Nations are part of the Second Committee and have an equal vote. Documents require a simple majority (51%) to pass and like other General Assembly Committees is not able to authorize armed interventions, impose sanctions or pass binding resolutions. Like all General Assembly committees the GA2 deals with matters regarding world peace, but focuses in the area of global finances and economics, within the field of the UN Charter.
The Second Committee is arguably the most important of the six General Assembly Committees, mainly due to the importance of managing finance while keeping the peace between nations. Since our world is meanwhile based on globalisation, including trading, debt between countries and transportation, an issue with finance can often lead to a global catastrophe. The GA2 has the important role of preventing such a catastrophe.
The GA2 is a relatively new committee that is not very common in MUN conferences, however it still is one of the most significant committees in the UN.

Topic 1: Promoting sustainable and resilient economic recovery in the post-conflict setting of Ethiopia. 

Topic 2: Addressing Global health investments: Strengthening health Systems for Sustainable Development.

Topic 3: Promoting Responsible Tourism Practices to Achieve Sustainable Economic Growth and Environmental Stewardship in Brazil.

Germany
DRC
Greece
Canada
South Korea
Switzerland 
Cuba
Poland
Spain
Ethiopia
Norway
Pakistan
China 
France
Netherlands
United Kingdom
Russia
Afghanistan
Ukraine
Kenya 
Brazil 
India 
USA  
Japan

GA3

3rd General Assembly Committee 

Social, Humanitarian, and Cultural

The Social, Humanitarian and Cultural Committee is the General Assembly’s Third Committee (GA3) and one of the six committees of the United Nations General Assembly. It includes all United Nations Member States, as under the UN Charter, all member states and observer states of the United Nations are part of the Third Committee and have an equal vote. Documents devised by the Third Committee require a simple majority (51%) to pass and like other General Assembly Committees is not able to authorise armed interventions, impose sanctions or pass binding resolutions.  Like all General Assembly committees the GA3 deals with matters regarding world peace, but focuses on dealing with affairs that threaten humans including reports of the special procedures of the newly established Human Rights Council.

Topic 1: Addressing the Human Rights Implications of Artificial Intelligence: Strengthening Legal and Ethical Frameworks for Responsible AI Development and Deployment.

Topic 2: Mitigating Racism and Hate Crimes in the Global Digital Sphere.

Topic 3: Fostering Global Collaboration to Improve Access to Mental Health Services for Vulnerable Populations in Lebanon.

 

Lebanon 
Greece
Canada
Palestine
Columbia
Italy
South Africa
Hungary
Poland
Brazil
Israel
Iran
United Kingdom
Kenya 
China 
France
Netherlands
Ukraine
USA  
Japan 
UAE
Russia 

GA4

4th General Assembly Committee 

Special Political and Decolonisation

The Special Political and Decolonization Committee is one of the main Committees of the United Nations General Assembly. It deals with a variety of issues, including those relating to human rights, decolonisation, outer space, peacekeeping, mining, and atomic radiation. In its first years, the Fourth Committee dealt primarily with matters relating to decolonisation (undoing the effects of colonialism) , due to the considerable amount of such happenings and their long-term impact. The Special Political Committee stood as a separate entity to the Fourth Committee, in 1993, the General Assembly adopted  resolution 47/233, which merged both. Today, the Committee includes all UN Member States and makes decisions in the form of resolutions, that are subject for final approval by the General Assembly.

Topic 1: Ensuring International Cooperation in Strategic and Military Operations in Space.

Topic 2: Establishing Guidelines for the Operation of Military Bases abroad.

Topic 3: Promoting Sustainable Economic Recovery and Social Reintegration for Former Child Soldiers in the DRC.

DRC
Greece
Turkey
Canada
Belgium
Egypt
Brazil
Hungary
Poland
Australia
Ghana
Saudi Arabia 
United States
Ethiopia
Mexico
Germany
United Kingdom
China 
France 
Russia
Pakistan
India 
UAE
Netherlands
Japan

 

GA6

6th General Assembly Committee 

Legal

The General Assembly’s Sixth Committee (GA6) of the United Nations, also known as the Legal Committee, is one of the six committees of the United Nations General Assembly. It includes all United Nations Member States. The former, being entitled to their own representation within the Legal Committee, as under the UN Charter, all member states and observer states of the United Nations are part of the Sixth Committee and have an equal vote. Documents devised by the Sixth Committee require a simple majority (51%) to pass, however the Legal Committee is subject to its own rules of procedure, as declared in Article 21 of the UN Charter. The Committee often meets in Ad Hoc form of debate and adopts draft resolutions without a vote. Like other General Assembly Committees is not able to authorise armed interventions, impose sanctions or pass binding resolutions.  Like all General Assembly committees the GA6 deals with matters regarding world peace, but focuses on dealing with legal questions in the General Assembly, within the field of the UN Charter.
Notable treaties by the Legal Committee include the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations of 1961 and the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court of 1998.
While law-making negotiations take place in a variety of specific bodies of the United Nations, depending on their subject-matter, negotiations related to general international law are usually held at the Sixth Committee.

Topic 1: Establishing Norms and Regulations to Strengthen International Cybersecurity and Personal Data Privacy.

Topic 2: Developing an International Legal.

Framework to Regulate Sex Work.

Topic 3: The Role and Effectiveness of International Law in Settling Territorial Disputes.

Canada
Taiwan
Netherlands
South Africa
Russia
Argentina
Italy
Spain
Iran
Indonesia
Mexico
Pakistan 
Sweden
South Korea
France
Thailand
United Kingdom
Ukraine
China 
Brazil 
India 
USA  
UAE
Germany

 

CSW

Commission on the Status of Women 

Status of Women

The Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) is the main UN body exclusively assigned to the advancement of gender equality and the empowerment of women. It is a functional commission of the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), and was established on the 21st of June 1946.  At MUNISS it too will be part of the General Assembly on the last day of our conference, resolutions do not need to be ratified by the General Assembly though.

Topic 1: Implementing Sustainable Development Initiatives to Empower Women in Rural Communities of Sub-Saharan Africa.

Topic 2: Ensuring Women’s Security in Conflict Settings.

Topic 3: Addressing the Growing Issue of the Gender Pay Gap.

South Africa
Switzerland 
Australia
Russia
France
Norway
Argentina
Italy
United States
Iran
Canada
United Kingdom
Germany
Netherlands
India
Afghanistan
China 
Japan
Ukraine
Sweden
Ukraine
Nigeria

 

WHO

World Health Organization

Topic 1: Pandemic Preparedness and Response: Strengthening Global Health Systems.

Topic 2: Addressing the Global Health Crisis of Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs).

Topic 3: Promoting Good Nutrition and Sustainable Food Systems for children in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Turkey
Bangladesh
South Korea
Bosnia
Australia
South Africa
Ghana
Iran
Indonesia
United Kingdom
Canada
China
Philippines
Germany
Thailand
Argentina
Ukraine
Russia
Vietnam
Sweden
UAE
Brazil 
India 
USA  

Advanced committees

ILO

International Labor Organization

International Labor Organization

The International Labor Organization (ILO) is the United Nations branch which deals with everything that has to do with labour worldwide. Its main goal is decent working conditions for everyone. It was set up in 1919, and currently 183 of all 193 UN member states are member of the ILO. The ILO has powers to register complaints when it feels that international rules with regards to labour are being violated; it however cannot impose sanctions on governments.
The ILO is composed of 28 government representatives, 14 workers’ representatives, and 14 employers’ representatives. Ten of these governmental seats are held by countries that are of great industrial importance. These countries are currently Brazil, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, the Russian Federation, the United Kingdom and the United States. The terms of office are three years.
The ILO is of major significance to the UN, as it is a watchdog and regulator for all the labour across member states. Without such an organisation no universal working condition regulations would be present and corporations as well as governments who have no regards for working conditions would be able to exploit their workers to the fullest.
Each year in June, the ILO organises the International Labour Conference. At this conference conventions and recommendations are crafted and adopted. Each member state has four representatives: two government delegates, an employer delegate and a worker delegate. Each delegate has an individual vote.

Topic 1: Decent Work in the Age of Artificial Intelligence: Protecting Workers’ Rights and Opportunities.

Topic 2: Fostering Entrepreneurship and Self-Employment in Developing Nations.

Topic 3: Addressing Concerning Working Conditions in Clothing Industry in Southeast Asia.

Greece
Bangladesh
Canada
Columbia
Switzerland 
Australia
South Africa
United States
Iran
India
Norway
United Kingdom
China
South Korea
Philippines
Germany
Netherlands
Argentina
Indonesia
France
Sweden
Ukraine
Russia 
Brazil 

 

UNESCO

Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organisation

Educational, Scientific, and Cultural

UNESCO was formed on November 16th 1945 with the goal of encouraging and coordinating international cooperation in education, science, culture and communication. Specifically, UNESCO is involved in the implementation of the access to quality education, the growth and conservation of a cultural environment rich in diversity and dialogue that values heritage, scientific advancements, and the freedom of expression. 

Topic 1: Promoting Media Literacy and Combating Misinformation in the Digital Age.

Topic 2: Balancing the role of Tourism and Development with the preservation of Cultural Heritage.

Topic 3: Supporting Technological Innovation to Improve Access to Educational Opportunities for All.

Turkey
Bangladesh
South Korea
Bosnia
Australia
South Africa
Ghana
Iran
Indonesia
United Kingdom
Canada
China
Philippines
Germany
Thailand
Argentina
Ukraine
Russia
Vietnam
Sweden
UAE
Brazil 
India 
USA  

 

HRC

Human Rights Council 

Human Rights

The Human Rights Council is an inter-governmental body within the United Nations system made up of 47 States responsible for the promotion and protection of all human rights around the globe. The UNHRC has 47 members elected for staggered three-year terms. The 38th session of the UNHRC began June 18, 2018. It ended on July 7, 2018. The headquarters of the council is in Geneva, Switzerland.

Topic 1: Addressing Human Rights Violations Against Migrants in Yemen.

Topic 2: Mitigating civilian abuse at the hands of police.

Topic 3: Discussing the breaches in human rights in Gaza due to the current conflict.

Turkey
Bangladesh
Nigeria
Russia
Netherlands
France
Mexico
Australia
Yemen
Egypt
United States
India
United Kingdom
China
Philippines
Germany
Indonesia
UAE
Saudi Arabia
Sweden
Australia
Argentina
Brazil 
Japan

 

ECOSOC

Economic and Social Council

Economic and Social

The United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) Committee focuses on annually assessing the progress in achieving the Internationally Agreed Development Goals (IADGs) and biennial enhancement the coherence and effectiveness of activities of different development partners. ECOSOC furthermore coordinates the work of 14 UN specialised agencies, ten functional commissions and five regional commissions. Moreover it receives reports from nine UN funds and programmes and issues policy recommendations to the UN system and to member states.
Under the UN Charter, ECOSOC is responsible for higher standards of living, full employment, and economic and social progress; identifying solutions to international economic, social and health problems; facilitating international, cultural and educational cooperation; and encouraging universal respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. ECOSOC’s purview extends over 70 percent of the human and financial resources of the entire UN system.
ECOSOC was established by the UN Charter in 1945, which was amended in 1965 and 1974 to increase the number of members from 18 to 54. ECOSOC membership is based on geographic representation: 14 seats are allocated to Africa, 11 to Asia, 6 to eastern Europe, 10 to Latin America and the Caribbean, and 13 to western Europe and other areas. Members are elected for three-year terms by the General Assembly. Four of the five permanent members of the Security Council have been continuously reelected because they provide funding for most of ECOSOC’s budget, which is the largest of any UN subsidiary body. Decisions are taken by simple majority vote. The presidency of ECOSOC changes annually.

Topic 1: Inclusive Financial Systems for Sustainable Development.

Topic 2: Addressing the Social Impact of Automation and Job Displacement.

Topic 3: Global Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture.

Iraq
Canada
Russia
Ghana
South Korea
South Africa
Mexico
Norway
Iran
Spain
China
France 
Japan
Vietnam
Saudi Arabia
Switzerland
Australia
USA  
United Kingdom
Germany
DPRK
Afghanistan 

 

CCPCJ

Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice

Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice

The Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice (CCPCJ) a functional commission of the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) based in Vienna. The commission serves as the primary organ that guides the activities of the United Nations in the fields of crime prevention and criminal justice​.

Topic 1: Addressing the Growing Threat of Human Trafficking.

Topic 2: Preventing Transnational Organized Crime (drug and weapon smuggling across countries).

Topic 3: Raising Awareness on the Global Money Laundering in the Americas.

Iraq
Canada
Russia
Ghana
Ukraine
Japan
Mexico
South Africa
Israel
Iran
Norway 
United Kingdom
Germany
Spain 
DPRK
Indonesia
Afghanistan 
France
Vietnam
Saudi Arabia
Switzerland
China 
India 
USA  
Australia

 

Expert committees

HSC

Historical Security Council

Historical Security Council

The Historical Security Council (HSC) is the Security Council (SC), but instead of discussing current day issues, one talks about historical situations that have influenced the world.

The Security Council is arguably one of the most important committees of the United Nations (UN) since its first session in 1946. The SC has powers that no other committee has: they have the power to allow the use of force, can issue binding decisions.
Another difference among the institutions in the UN is that the Permanent 5 countries (P5), the Russian Federation, the People’s Republic of China, the United States of America, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and the French Republic, have veto powers: if one of the P5 vetoes a decision, it puts an absolute stop to any decision that was being made.
Except for the five permanent members in the SC, there are ten more countries elected every two years, the non-permanent members. The current non-permanent members are Chad, Nigeria, Angola, Jordan, Malaysia, Chile, Venezuela, New Zealand, Spain and Lithuania.

Topic 1: Addressing the Humanitarian Crisis Resulting from the Indo-Pakistani War of 1971.

Topic 2: The Aftermath of the Palestine Conflict of 1948: The Creation of Israel and the Palestinian Refugee Crisis.

Topic 3: Restoring Peace and Stability in the Balkans following the Yugoslav Wars (1991-2001).

Spain
Germany
India
Russia
Palestine
Ireland
China
Egypt
United Kingdom
France 
Bosnia 
Romania 
Pakistan
Israel
United States 
 

SC

Security Council

Security Council

The United Nations Security Council (UNSC) is in charge with maintaining international peace and security. The United Nations Security Council also approves changes to its United Nations Charter, establishes peacekeepers and peacekeeping operations, and has the authorisation to approve military action through resolution made and passed by the security council.
The United Nation Security Council has the role of keeping the world safe, being in charge of international security. The United Nation Security Council calls upon its members to peacefully resolve international disputes and if needed, with military resources

Topic 1: The Conflict in Israel and Palestine.

Topic 2: Addressing the Ongoing Conflict in Myanmar.

Topic 3: Ensuring Maritime Security in the Red Sea.

Spain
Germany
India
Algeria
Myanmar
United States
Myanmar
Ireland
Brazil
Ireland
Yemen
Egypt
Israel
China
Russia 
United Kingdom